Prostate Cancer Risk Testing

Longevity Medical offers some of the newest researched testing options available in the assessment and active surveillance of Prostate Cancer.

Mi-Prostate Score:  Mi-Prostate Score is a specialized urine test that incorporates three specific markers that could indicate cancer and studies have shown that the combination is far more accurate than PSA alone. Mi-Prostate Score, or MiPS, tests for the genetic anomaly that occurs in about half of all prostate cancers, an instance of two genes changing places and fusing together. This gene fusion, T2:ERG, is believed to cause prostate cancer. Studies in prostate tissues show that the gene fusion almost always indicates cancer.  The new urine test looks for the T2:ERG fusion as well as another marker, PCA3. This is combined with serum PSA measure to produce a risk assessment for prostate cancer. The test also predicts risk for having an aggressive tumor, helping doctors and patients make decisions about whether to wait and monitor test levels or pursue immediate biopsy. Although this test cannot say definitively at diagnosis whether a man has aggressive prostate cancer, it can provide a more accurate estimate of the likelihood of having cancer and the likelihood of that cancer being aggressive.

MiPS FAQ:  http://www.mlabs.umich.edu/files/pdfs/MiPS_FAQ.pdf

4K Score:   The 4Kscore Test helps clarify a patient’s specific probability for finding aggressive prostate cancer upon biopsy. These are the aggressive prostate cancers that always require more than active surveillance, but more specific medical treatment or intervention. The 4Kscore Test predicts the risk percent score from <1% to >95% of a man having aggressive cancer in a prospective biopsy.

4K Score FAQ:   http://4kscore.opko.com/4kscore-test/frequently-asked-questions

Circulating Tumor Cells:  Circulating Tumor Cell (CTC) testing is used to monitor metastatic breast, colorectal and prostate cancers. CTC’s are cancer cells that detach from solid tumors and enter the blood stream. This simple blood test may be performed prior to the start of therapy and any time during the course of treatment, and helps us monitor the progression of metastatic cancer and evaluate the effectiveness of treatment.

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